January 17, 2021

ECB braced for up to £182m worth of cuts

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Last Updated: 06/08/20 10:58am

ECB chief executive Tom Harrison had warned of losses as early as May this year ECB chief executive Tom Harrison had warned of losses as early as May this year

ECB chief executive Tom Harrison had warned of losses as early as May this year

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) is set to make sizeable cuts across all areas of cricket to cover losses of up to £182m caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The governing body met with the 18 counties on Wednesday to discuss a way forward and establish their next steps as they look to mitigate losses caused primarily by playing games behind closed doors.

It follows a stark warning from ECB chief executive Tom Harrison who told a government committee in May that cricket has been presented with its “most significant financial challenge”.

England's summer cricket schedule has been played behind closed doors England's summer cricket schedule has been played behind closed doors

England’s summer cricket schedule has been played behind closed doors

It is understood that cuts will impact all areas of the game and will involve some degree of job losses at the ECB, while England central contracts will face review.

Current losses due to pandemic stand at £106 million but they could rise further to £182m if Australia fail to tour later this summer.

The Australians could still play in a six-game limited overs series once England’s current three Test, three Twenty20 schedule against Pakistan concludes in September, but there has been no official confirmation if they will.

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Harrison explains why it is important for the growth of cricket that The Hundred launches in 2021

Harrison explains why it is important for the growth of cricket that The Hundred launches in 2021

While England’s Test series against the West Indies went ahead, the loss of revenue without fans attending matches, combined with the likes of the inaugural The Hundred competition being moved to 2021, have adversely affected the body’s finances.

It also remains unclear when spectators will be allowed back into sporting venues, with July’s spectator trial – which included crickethastily abandoned after a spike in coronavirus cases.

The ECB will continue to discuss further cost savings with each of the county sides as it attempts to manage the current crisis.